Early Conceptualisation of Gestalt Therapy’s Understanding of Introjection

Gestalt therapy, a distinctive form of psychotherapy, developed by Lore and Fritz Perls, offers a nuanced approach to understanding and facilitating human growth and development. This method emerged from the Perls’ personal and professional experiences, as well as the influence of their peers and the cultural environment surrounding them.

In the early stages of their exploration, Lore Perls focused on what might seem mundane—infant feeding and weaning practices. However, her observations provided profound insights into human behavior and psychology. She noted that the manner in which food is introduced to infants—often hurried and without allowing the child to “chew”—parallels how people are introduced to new knowledge and experiences. Lore Perls identified this rushed process as “introjection,” where individuals absorb information without fully processing it, a concept that would become central to Gestalt therapy.

Expanding on this idea, Lore argued that true understanding and learning require time and patience, akin to the physical act of chewing. This metaphor highlighted the importance of fully engaging with and processing new information, rather than passively accepting it. In her 1939 lecture “Child Raising and Peace,” she further discussed the role of aggression in creative change, warning against the suppression of aggressive impulses as it could lead to intellectual inhibition and a lack of critical thinking.

Her insights were complemented by Fritz Perls’ contributions. At the 1936 International Psychoanalytic Congress, Fritz presented a lecture on “Oral Resistances,” where he explored children’s natural resistance to forced feeding. He argued that such resistance is not limited to eating but can extend to intellectual matters as well. Fritz observed that most people conform to the intellectual “diet” they are allowed, while only a few question and choose what truly resonates with them.

These ideas were further elaborated in Fritz Perls’ book “Ego, Hunger and Aggression,” co-written with Lore during their exile in South Africa. The book critiqued traditional psychoanalytic techniques, emphasizing the need for a self-directed assimilation of experiences—a stark contrast to the often authoritarian approach observed in conventional psychoanalysis. Fritz criticized these methods for projecting predetermined notions onto patients, which he termed “intropress,” borrowing from the concepts discussed by Sándor Ferenczi, another influential psychoanalyst who advocated for considering psychoanalytic interpretations as mere suggestions.

Gestalt therapy, thus, encourages individuals to actively engage with their experiences and emotions in the present moment. It promotes awareness and personal responsibility, enabling individuals to navigate their own psychological landscapes independently. This approach stands in contrast to the intellectual passivity and reliance on authority that the Perls critiqued, particularly within the rigid educational and political systems of their time.

By integrating these psychological insights with broader socio-political observations, the Perls developed Gestalt therapy not just as a therapeutic method, but as a form of intellectual and emotional liberation, advocating for a more mindful, autonomous, and critically engaged way of living and learning.

References

Bocian, B. (2015). Fritz Perls in Berlin 1893-1933: Expressionism Psychoanalysis Judaism. EHP-Verlag Andreas Kohlhage.

Perls, L. (1997). Der Weg zur Gestalttherapie. Lore Perls im Gespräch mit Daniel Rosenblatt. Wuppertal