Different Facets of Countertransference

Different feelings brought about by countertransference during a therapy session. Here is a rundown of how countertransference within a therapeutic relationship can manifest itself.

 

Transferences from therapist’s own childhood unfinished business is put onto the client. For example, the client reminds the therapist of his controlling mother.

Reactive feelings arising from therapist’s own narcissism.  Like defiance, being offended, wanting to take revenge, envy, lust, feeling insecure, feeling  inferior or superior, etc.

Complementary countertransference: when the therapist encounters the transference of the client, out of which incites the therapist to behave towards / feel towards the client the way the client’s  caregiver or significant other  would feel.

Identification with client’s significant other (parent, child, spouse, children, boss): in such a way that the therapist cannot empathize with the client.

Projective IdentificationFeelings of the patient’s childhood experiences which have been split/dissociated, and projected onto the therapist and simultaneously the therapist feels and acts in a way (e.g. sadistic, critical, judgmental… like his father) that leaves the therapist bewildered.

The consequences unrealized countertransference feelings is that the client is robbed of the empathy he/she needs from the therapeutic sessions, which ultimately renders the therapy unprogressive.

The challenging job of the psychotherapist is to be constantly aware of these feelings and the sources of these transference. Self awareness through self therapy, and workshops and supervision are the only and best way to work through these transferences.

 

 

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